Our Marketing Story: Condensed and Ready to Sell?

Here at Savvy History, we love the power of stories.  My main goal as a specialized reading teacher and a songwriter is to communicate the extraordinary potential of using the right story at the right time to address the right aliment.

Wrapped up in this daily mission, it’s somewhat surprising I didn’t stop to think about Savvy History's overall story until I came across Pete at DYEB’s excellent podcast episodes. 

If you are interested in harnessing the power of stories while marketing your ideas, here is a link to his post and his podcast series. 

Below is an example of blending marketing strategies with our brand's overall story.  It was a useful exercise.

The Savvy History Story (Condensed)

1. Main Characters - Creative people with original and useful ideas.       

2. The Chasm - A large space between level 1 and level 5 in The Theory of Positive Disintegration

(TPD is an extremely useful psychological theory connecting self-actualization to creativity.)  

3. The Stakes - You die before your original ideas have a chance to help anyone. 

Or worse... you live a miserable cynical narcissistic life spreading despair to others.  Boooooo!         

4. The Desire - Creative confidence and financial knowledge (useful for launching new ideas from a financially healthy and mentally healthy space).             

5. The Problem(s) - Lack of...

  • time

  • money

  • business skills

  • social support

  • the usual

Plus, throw in some...

Past-hangups and self-doubt.

Multipotentiality leading to hard choices.

(For me personally, I don’t want to tour as a mommy musician.  At the same time, I have an album brewing with the best songs I’ve ever written.)                 

6. The Villan(s) - Fear.  Burn out.  Monkey brain.

Caring what others think.

Perfectionism fueling procrastination. 

Limiting beliefs about the intersection between creativity and business.                         

7. The Guide(s) -

A digital minimalist on a mission to make peace with the internet.

Follow at your own risk as I frequent the personal finance world in order to collect left-brained guides and interpret  **boring** information through the eyes of an artist. 

Luckily, my husband plans to keep the physical world running with money-saving DIY skills (cooking, cleaning, home repair, remodeling, etc.).

8. The Plan - Decipher our past experiences as full-time musicians.

Dissect where it went right and where it went wrong (especially with advertising).  Make fun of ourselves.

Learn along with others while providing distilled useful information.

Become better with personal finance, e-marketing, and freelance writing while simultaneously recording 30 songs about overlooked historical people! 

BAM!

9. The Incident - I used to be a whiny baby about promoting myself. 

Now I have genuine self-confidence (and ideas that put a pep in my step). 

Why?

Because I learned about creative psychology and business.

Not to be overlooked - if you are a sponge to your environment, learn how to create an environment worth absorbing.  See TPD!

10. Happy Ending - Creative people are able to be creative most of the day while enjoying health and mental wellness.  As an extra bonus, they don't have scarcity complexes or bury money in the backyard.

Are you an introverted quiet person prepared to GET LOUD online with a useful idea? I’d love to hear where your story overlaps with the above story (and what you plan to do about it).

Do you see any holes or have any questions?  Please comment below!

DISCLAIMER: AS ALWAYS, IF YOU NEED PSYCHOLOGICAL OR FINANCIAL ADVICE PLEASE SEEK A PROFESSIONAL FOR YOUR SPECIFIC SITUATION.

 

2 Replies to “Our Marketing Story: Condensed and Ready to Sell?”

  1. Interesting framework. One of my advisors in school who in his previous life was a marketing executive encouraged students to think of themselves as superheroes and maybe find a superhero character they can identify with. It’s a really fun exercise and at the time helped me to create a structure for my personal story.

    1. Thank you for stopping by the blog! Your comment really reminds me of a book called The Alter Ego Effect. Like your advisor, I hope to have my students pick an alter-ego on the first day of school this year to help carry them through the hard times that are sure to come as they learn new concepts. I’m sure superheroes will come out strong on the list!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *